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What does it mean ?
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Lag ou lagg

Updated : Wednesday 19 May 2010

According to Dikeus, who suggested this word, a lag is "the slowing down of a video game due to the internet". Technically speaking, a "lag" happens when there are too many people playing one game in the same geographic area. This results in data saturation between the game server and the player’s computer. The "lag" shows up as a slowing down of the game or as jerky images. "Lag" can be used both as a noun and as a verb, as in "WTF, my game’s lagging".

Lag is to the No life (or video game fanatic) what jet-lag is to the long-haul traveller: a real pain. Every player dreads being confronted with lag just as he’s about to get to the next level. In fact, lag is the price of a computer game’s success: the more popular the game, and the more players it attracts, the greater the risk of lag. Our advice: if you want your play to be lag-free, stick to the games no one is interested in. Lag doesn’t happen just with computer games, it covers any problem with reception of an image, as when you are watching a film: "I can’t watch the latest series of The Wire I’ve just downloaded, it lags, I don’t know why." If you are having trouble watching your Blu-Rays and you want to get your geeky neighbour on the case, don’t say "I don’t understand how this Blu-Ray system works, can you help me?" but, "my BR has a bad lag, can you do something?". You have a better chance of getting him interested if you speak his language… Lag is one of those words you hear more and more, it sounds young and fashionable, so it’s a safe bet that it’s only a matter of time before it starts to be used for other things than video. If your company’s having problems you can say, “my firm’s showing some lag right now” — much more web 2.0 than "it’s going through a bad patch". The same "lag" could be used as a way of warning your husband that your relationship is under threat: "I feel our relationship is lagging". Much more “now”, not to mention more diplomatic, than telling him it’s on the rocks or you’re about to walk.

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